Being Gay - Is OK!

Being Gay is Ok - wristbands

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Every day in schools, young LGBT people hear the word "gay" in a negative context and this often leads to feelings of low self-esteem or, in some cases, mental health problems.

A recent survey undertaken in British schools showed:

  • 95% of pupils hear the word ‘gay’ being used as an insult or something they don't like
  • Only 9% of pupils thought that a pupil or member of staff would feel safe telling people they were LGBT in school
  • Over half of pupils had witnessed homophobic bullying in school
  • 13% said that reporting bullying actually resulted in anything being done about it
  • 75% of staff had witnessed homophobic bullying in school
  • 58% did not feel that their school was a safe and welcoming place for lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender pupils

 

An NHS survey found:

  • More than half (55 per cent) of lesbian, gay and bi pupils have experienced direct bullying
  • Almost a third of lesbian, gay and bi pupils are ignored or isolated by other people
  • Two in five (41 per cent) have attempted, or thought about, taking their own life directly because of bullying and the same number say that they deliberately self-harm directly because of bullying

By wearing a wristband, teachers, support staff and fellow students can demonstrate their ‘acceptance’ and support for young  LGBT by means of a silent affirmation.

Wristbands cost £1.00 to cover production costs and I would be happy to produce posters, speak in an assembly or whatever you think is appropriate and fits with your schools policies.

Please bring this to the attention of staff and students alike, regardless of sexual orientation.

Eq Skills Training Centre

In March 2012 Equilibrium opened a Skills Training Centre specifically targeting young people 14 to 19 who were NEET or at risk of becoming NEET. The centre offered National Vocational Qualifications in Motor Vehicle, Construction, Catering & Hospitality, Conservation & Environmental Skills and Horticulture. In addition to this, students would also study for a functional award in both Maths and English.  For many of our students, this was their first academic success which then gave them the confidence to go on to study for higher level awards at mainstream colleges

In March 2012 Equilibrium opened a Skills Training Centre specifically targeting young people 14 to 19 who were NEET or at risk of becoming NEET. The centre offered National Vocational Qualifications in Motor Vehicle, Construction, Catering & Hospitality, Conservation & Environmental Skills and Horticulture. In addition to this, students would also study for a functional award in both Maths and English.

For many of our students, this was their first academic success which then gave them the confidence to go on to study for higher level awards at mainstream colleges

 

Afrilibrium

Students and staff from Eq Skills Training Centre building a much desired play area for Mozambican Street Children's Charity  called Hope In Mozambique. The Charity contacted Eq through one of their Dorset based supporters and asked if we could undertake this project. The students raised all of the monies required to cover their costs and the costs of the building materials and staff happily covered their own costs; so there was no financial burden to the charity.  Upon their return, it was agreed to set up 'Afrilibrium' to continue to support the work in Mozambique and hopefully one day open a skills training centre out there, to give street children opportunities to develop practical skills which in turn will help them find employment and be able to provide for themselves and their siblings / family.

Students and staff from Eq Skills Training Centre building a much desired play area for Mozambican Street Children's Charity  called Hope In Mozambique. The Charity contacted Eq through one of their Dorset based supporters and asked if we could undertake this project. The students raised all of the monies required to cover their costs and the costs of the building materials and staff happily covered their own costs; so there was no financial burden to the charity.

Upon their return, it was agreed to set up 'Afrilibrium' to continue to support the work in Mozambique and hopefully one day open a skills training centre out there, to give street children opportunities to develop practical skills which in turn will help them find employment and be able to provide for themselves and their siblings / family.

 

DADS & LADS

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Dads & Lads Motor Project

“Any man can be a father but it takes someone special to be a dad.”

The aim of Dads and Lads North Dorset Motor Project is to engage and work with young people, particularly young men who are identified as not engaging with their education and/or engaged in criminal or anti-social behaviour, by involving them in a structured programme of motorcycle training, which we believe will give them a more positive focus. 

Phase one: 

Using the motorcycles as an incentive, primarily target and engage young people who are raising concerns. However, the programme will be open to all young people and will not exclude anyone. Those not presenting with problematic behaviours, can act as positive role models for the others.

Phase two: 

Quite often many of the problems are rooted in difficult child/adult relationships brought about by the adolescent need to assert independence, which can lead to tension, conflict and rebelliousness. With this in mind, phase two will encourage the fathers of the boys attending and engage both in a positive, shared experience. Alongside this we will offer the fathers some parenting skills' workshops, so that they might feel better equipped to positively parent their child.

(also available to mothers and daughters).

"It was hard work but fantastic fun especially riding with my Dad!" Ollie. Aged 12